Agenda and draft minutes

Venue: Via Microsoft Teams

Contact: Jenny Hazell (Committee Services)  Email: jenny.hazell@reading.gov.uk

Media

Items
No. Item

19.

Appointment of Chair For the Meeting

Minutes:

Councillor Debs Absolom was appointed to act as Chair of the meeting.

 

20.

Minutes of previous Meeting pdf icon PDF 138 KB

To confirm the minutes of the meeting held on 16 September 2020.

Minutes:

The Minutes of the meeting of 16 September 2020 were confirmed as a correct record.

 

21.

Questions from Members of the Public and Councillors pdf icon PDF 76 KB

Questions submitted pursuant to Standing Order 36 in relation to matters falling within the Sub-Committee’s Powers & Duties which have been submitted in writing and received by the Head of Legal & Democratic Services no later than four clear working days before the meeting.

Minutes:

Questions on the following matters were submitted, and answered by the Lead Councillor for Strategic Environment Planning and Transport on behalf of the Chair:

 

Questioner

Subject

Mr A Pegg

Proposed trial full closure of the entrance into Eastern Avenue at junction with Wokingham Road

Councillor Whitham

Cycle scheme underspend 

Councillor Whitham

Electronic visitors' permits 

(The full text of the questions and replies was made available on the Reading Borough Council website).

 

22.

Receipt of Petition - Traffic Calming Planters on Hamilton Road pdf icon PDF 199 KB

To report the receipt of a petition requesting the installation of traffic calming planters on Hamilton Road.

Minutes:

(a)     Receipt of petition – Traffic Calming Planters on Hamilton Road

The Executive Director for Economic Growth and Neighbourhood Services submitted a report informing the Sub-Committee that the Council had received a petition, requesting the installation of traffic calming planters on Hamilton Road. 

The report explained that the petition, which had contained 44 signatures, read as follows:

“Please install wooden planters to narrow Hamilton Road at strategic points. This will give the following advantages:

Reduce traffic speed (pollution and safety benefits)

Emphasise to drivers that this is a residential area with a 20mph limit

Increase plant diversity and quantity on the road with benefits to insect and birdlife

Improved air-quality (plants are good!)

The planters could be long and narrow to stretch out into the road without taking up parking spaces

To narrow the road as much as possible but still allow wide enough access for emergency access, deliveries etc.

Positions TBC but probably just outside the ends of parking bays (maybe around the crescent crossroads and at the outer ends of Hamilton.

Only in places with no drives opposite so access not restricted”

The report stated that the request raised within the petition would be investigated by officers and a report submitted to a future meeting of the Sub-Committee for consideration.

Resolved –

(1)   That the report be noted;

(2)   That the request be investigated, and a report submitted to a future meeting of the Sub-Committee for consideration;

(3)   That the lead petitioner be informed accordingly.

 

23.

Results of Statutory Consultation Objections- Funded by Local Community Infrastructure Levy (CIL) Contributions pdf icon PDF 152 KB

A report providing the Sub-Committee with feedback received as part of the legal consultations that were necessary for the development of a number of transport-related schemes, funded by local Community Infrastructure Levy (CIL) contributions.

 

Additional documents:

Minutes:

The Executive Director for Economic Growth and Neighbourhood Services submitted a report, providing the Sub-Committee with the feedback that had been received as part of the legal consultations that were necessary for the development of a number of transport-related schemes, funded by the local Community Infrastructure Levy (CIL) contributions. The report set out a summary of the scheme developments and the outcome of consultations for each transport CIL scheme. 

Two CIL schemes had received applicable objections following statutory consultations - the Tiger Crossing on Gosbrook Road, as set out in Appendix 1 of the report and the extension of 20mph zone on Northumberland Avenue (past Reading Girls School), which was set out at Appendix 1.2. For this latter scheme, the statutory consultation had ended at midnight on 5 November 2020.  

Officers advised the Sub-Committee that in respect of the Northumberland Avenue scheme they had developed a modified proposal, which had been included in an updated report, that would overcome some of the objections that had been received following the ending of the statutory consultation at midnight on 5 November 2020. Officers further advised that there would be no need to re-consult if the modified proposal was agreed.

The report stated that in respect of the schemes that had not received any objections applicable to these consultations the proposals would be implemented as advertised. Officers were working on a programme of delivering these schemes, with the intention of starting some of them schemes by the end of November 2020.  

Resolved -

(1)   That the report be noted;

(2)   That the scheme for the Tiger Crossing on Gosbrook Road, as set out in Appendix 1, be implemented;

(3)   That the modified scheme for the extension of a 20mph zone on Northumberland Avenue (past Reading Girls’ School), as set out in Appendix 1.2, without necessitating a further consultation process, be implemented;

(4)   That the Assistant Director of Legal and Democratic Services be authorised to seal the resultant Traffic Regulation Orders and no public inquiry be held into the proposals;

(5)   That the respondents to the statutory consultations be informed of the decisions of the Sub-Committee accordingly, following publication of the minutes of the meeting.

 

24.

CIL Locally Funded Scheme - Redlands Ward 20mph enhancements pdf icon PDF 155 KB

A report asking the Sub-Committee to agree to statutory consultations being conducted regarding a range of physical measures on improving motorist compliance to the 20mph zone in Redlands Ward.

 

Additional documents:

Minutes:

The Executive Director for Economic Growth and Neighbourhood Services submitted a report, providing the Sub-Committee with a range of physical measures on improving motorist compliance to the 20mph zone in Redlands Ward. The Scheme had already received funding from CIL contributions.  An overview map of the area was attached to the report at Appendix 1 and drawings showing the range of physical measures that had been proposed and a photograph showing, indicatively, the proposed parking bay islands for Kendrick Road was attached to the report at Appendix 2.

The report provided details of the proposed scheme. This included humps/cushions; priority-flow traffic islands (Redlands Road), Junction Island (Allcroft Road), ‘Rubber Kerbing’ Build-Outs (Kendrick Road), Pinch-point along Redlands Road (narrowing the carriageway width) and 20mph repeater signs along a number of roads. It was anticipated that these features would likely fully spend the allocated £100k project costs. If there was any remaining budget, the report proposed that the money would be used to refresh the painted ‘20’ roundels on the carriageway.  Officers advised the Sub-Committee that the measures would be effective at all times in speed reduction.

The Sub-Committee discussed the report and welcomed the range of measures for compliance to the 20mph zone in Redlands Ward.  However, they requested that the statutory consultations that would be undertaken by Officers should encompass the totality of the proposals, not just the statutory elements.  Officers confirmed that they would ensure that the consultation would encompass feedback on the whole scheme, the results of which would be submitted to a future meeting.

Resolved -

(1)   That the report be noted;

(2)   That the scheme, as proposed in paragraph 4.6 of the report and Appendix 2, be agreed for this local CIL funding allocation;

(3)   That the Assistant Director of Legal and Democratic Services be authorised to undertake the statutory advertisement processes for the traffic calming features set out in Appendix 2;

(4)   That the Network & Parking Services Manager, in consultation with the Lead Councillor for Strategic Planning, Environment and Transport, be authorised to make minor changes to the proposals;

(5)   That subject to no objections being received, the Assistant Director of Legal and Democratic Services be authorised to seal the applicable Traffic Regulation Orders and Officers proceed to scheme implementation;

(6)   That any objection(s) received following the statutory advertisements be submitted to a future meeting;

(7)   That no public inquiry be held into the proposals.

 

25.

On-Street Pay and Display (Oxford Road and Wokingham Road local centre) Tariffs pdf icon PDF 185 KB

A report seeking the Sub-Committee’s approval for an on-street pay and display tariff along the Oxford Road and Wokingham Road local centre and asking to retain current free parking and to set a number of tariff charges.

 

Minutes:

The Executive Director for Economic Growth and Neighbourhood Services submitted a report, that sought the Sub-Committee’s approval for an on-street pay and display tariff along Oxford Road (two sections) and Wokingham Road local centre. The report also asked the Sub-Committee to consider retaining the current 30-minute free parking within the Oxford Road local centre and within the Wokingham Road local centre and set a tariff of charges between 8am and 8pm up to a maximum stay of two hours. Finally, the report asked the Sub-Committee to consider setting a tariff of charges on the Oxford Road between the town centre and Bedford Road between 8am to 8pm. 

The report explained that the current on-street waiting restrictions within the Oxford Road and Wokingham Road local centres only allowed 30 minutes maximum stay which was difficult to enforce as a Civil Enforcement Officer would be required to return after 30 minutes of the initial observation and then allow a 10-minute mandatory grace period before enforcement action The report explained that in determination the changes to the waiting restrictions in these areas, it was considered that 30 minutes was not long enough to allow customers to use many of the businesses in these areas. For example, there were many beauty shops and hair salons along the Oxford Road and 30 minutes parking was not long enough to allow customers to use these services. The proposal would extend the maximum length of stay in both the Oxford Road and Wokingham Road local centres from 30 minutes to two hours. The proposal would providea greater opportunity for people to visit local businesses for longer and support the local economy, whilst encouraging more sustainable localised travel for longer stays. The proposed tariffs were set out in the report at paragraph 5.5.

Resolved -

(1)     That the report be noted;

(2)     That the Assistant Director of Legal and Democratic Services be authorised to undertake the statutory advertisement processes for the tariffs set out in paragraph 5.5 of the report.

(3)     That the Assistant Director of Legal and Democratic Services be authorised      to undertake the statutory advertisement processes for the following tariffs:

Oxford Road

·         Section 1: Town Centre to Bedford Rd – Tariff to reflect town centre structure and tariff but with a reduced charge of 50p for the initial 20 minutes.

·         up to 20mins 50p

·         up to 40 mins £1.20

·         up to 1 hour £1.60

·         up to 1 hour 20 mins £2.20

·         up to 1 hour 40 mins £2.70

·         up to 2 hours £3.20

·         Section 2: Local Centre - Bedford Road to Grovelands Road first 30mins free – remainder of the tariff in 30- minute segments up to a maximum stay of 2 hours:

·         up to 30mins free

·         up to 1 hour £1.60

·         up to 1 ½ hour £2.50

·         up to 2 hours £3.20

Wokingham Road local centre

·         up to 30mins free

·         up to 1 hour £1.60

·         up to 1 ½ hour £2.50

·         up to 2 hours £3.20

 

26.

Department for Transport Roads Policing Review pdf icon PDF 147 KB

A report providing the Sub-Committee with the Council’s response to the Government’s Department for Transport (DfT) Roads Policing Review.

Additional documents:

Minutes:

The Executive Director for Economic Growth and Neighbourhood Services submitted a report, submitted a report on the Council’s response to the Government’s (Department for Transport (DfT)) roads policing review.

The report stated that since 2010 there had been an increase in the number of people killed and seriously injured on the roads. In response to this situation, the DfT had instituted a roads policing review working with the Home Office, the National Police Chiefs’ Council and other agencies. As part of this review, the Government was exploring better use of intelligence to target dangerous behaviours, the use of technology in enforcing road traffic law and a better understanding of the value of enforcement in influencing road user behaviour and the current enforcement capability. The DfT had invited local authorities to respond to its review.

The report advised that the police were the primary enforcement agency, with roads policing in England and Wales being provided by the 43 geographically based police forces. However, local authorities also played a role in enforcement, primarily relating to managing traffic flow through enforcement of bus lanes, parking and, in London, other moving traffic offences such as box junctions.

Appended to the report was a copy of the Council’s response to the roads policing review, dated 5 October 2020. As part of the Council’s response, reference was made to local authorities such as Reading being given an opportunity to play an active role in speed enforcement, particularly in enforcing 20 mph speed limit zones. Thames Valley Police had declared a policy of not enforcing/ supporting 20mph speed enforcement. The Council’s response acknowledged that this response may be justified by the police in terms of reduced resources and the need to focus on higher policing priorities, but it left local authorities in an unacceptable situation. The Council was therefore seeking to be given the powers to devise more effective methods for enforcing contravention of speed limits up to a certain threshold such as up to 40mph. As part of this, the Council would require the fines to be reinvested in further enforcement and environmental measures, as was currently required from bus lane penalties and parking contraventions.

In short, the Council’s response was to call on the DfT, Home Office, Thames Valley Police and the Police and Crime Commissioner for the Thames Valley to work with the Council to take forward such speed enforcement initiatives in Reading.

The Sub-Committee discussed the report and commented favourably on the response that had been given by the Council to the DfT’s Roads Policing Review.

Resolved –    That the report and the Council response to the DfT’s Roads Policing Review be noted.

 

27.

Exclusion of Press and Public

The following motion will be moved by the Chair:

“That, pursuant to Section 100A of the Local Government Act 1972 (as amended) members of the press and public be excluded during consideration of the following item on the agenda, as it is likely that there would be disclosure of exempt information as defined in the relevant Paragraphs of Part 1 of Schedule 12A of that Act”

Minutes:

Resolved -    That, pursuant to Section 100A of the Local Government Act 1972 (as amended) members of the press and public be excluded during consideration of item 28 below, as it was likely that there would be disclosure of exempt information as defined in Paragraphs 1 and 2 of Part 1 of Schedule 12A of that Act.

 

28.

Applications for Discretionary Parking Permits

To consider appeals against the refusal of applications for the issue of discretionary parking permits.

 

Minutes:

The Executive Director for Economic Growth and Neighbourhood Services submitted a report giving details of the background to her decisions to refuse applications for Discretionary Parking Permits from 21 applicants, who had subsequently appealed against these decisions.

 

Resolved –

(1)     That with regard to application 1, a second Discretionary Resident Parking Permit, personal to the applicant, be issued, subject to adequate proofs being provided and charged Discretionary Visitor Books;

 

(2)     That with regard to application 2, a first Discretionary Resident Parking Permit, personal to the applicant, be issued and two free Discretionary Visitors Books;

 

(3)     That with regard to application 3, a decision be deferred until the next meeting in order for officers to clarify the position regarding the Council’s current policy of issuing Permits to Healthcare professional workers in view of the second coronavirus lockdown which came into effect on 5 November 2020;  in the interim a temporary Healthcare Professional permit to be issued, free of charge, valid until 31 January 2021.

 

(4)     That with regard to applications 4, 12 and 15, a first Discretionary Resident Permit be issued, personal to the applicant, subject to adequate proofs being provided;

 

(5)     That with regard to application 7, a first Discretionary Resident Permit be issued;

 

(6)     That with regard to application 10 for a first Discretionary Resident Permit, the application be allowed subject to confirmation from Officers that the capacity figure is below 100% and to adequate proofs being provided;

 

(7)     That with regard to application 14, a second Discretionary Resident Permit be issued personal to the applicant,subject to adequate proofs being provided;

 

(8)     That with regard to application 16, a third Discretionary Resident Permit be issued personal to the applicant;

 

(9)     That with regard to application 17, a decision be deferred until the next meeting in order for officers, in consultation with Councillor Terry, to have further discussions with officers from Brighter Future for Children regarding the criteria for Healthcare Professionals. In the interim, a temporary Healthcare Professional permit be issued, free of charge, valid until 31 January 2021; 

(10)    That with regard to application 20, four Discretionary Resident Permits be issued, at a charge of the first Resident’s Permit rate per Permit, currently £40, and subject to confirmation of the vehicle registration numbers; and one Discretionary Business Permit be issued at the full rate of £330, subject to adequate proofs being provided;

 

 (11)   That the Executive Director for Economic Growth and Neighbourhood Services’ decision to refuse applications 13 and 21 be upheld and the applicants be informed that they could each apply for a Discretionary Business Permit;

 

(12)    That the Executive Director for Economic Growth and Neighbourhood Services’ decision to refuse applications 5, 6, 8, 9, 11, 18 and 19 be upheld.

 

 (Exempt information as defined in Paragraphs 1 and 2).