Agenda and minutes

Venue: Council Chambers, Civic Offices, Reading

Contact: Richard Woodford - Committee Administrator Email: (richard.woodford@reading.gov.uk)  0118 9372332

Link: webcast of meeting

Items
No. Item

23.

Minutes pdf icon PDF 105 KB

Minutes:

The Minutes of the meeting held on 21 October 2019 were confirmed as a correct record and signed by the Chair.

24.

Questions from Members of the Public and Councillors pdf icon PDF 32 KB

Questions submitted pursuant to Standing Order 36 in relation to matters falling within the Committee’s Powers & Duties which have been submitted in writing and received by the Head of Legal & Democratic Services no later than four clear working days before the meeting.

Minutes:

A question on the following matter was submitted:

Questioner

Subject

Reply

Councillor Ballsdon

Recruitment and Retention of Care Staff after Brexit

Councillor Jones

(The full text of the question and reply was made available on the Reading Borough Council website).

25.

Royal Berkshire NHS Foundation Trust - Annual Report and Quality Report

This item will focus on:

·         A&E and Waiting Lists

·         Winter Pressure

·         Staffing

Minutes:

Dominic Hardy, Chief Operating Officer, Royal Berkshire NHS Foundation Trust, attended the meeting and gave a presentation on Winter Preparedness.

The Royal Berkshire Hospital was currently in its peak period and focus was on the safe and timely care of patents.  Additional ward capacity had been provided with Mortimer ward re-opening, Redlands ward being used for medical patients and the Emergency Department Minors Unit using the Primary Care Unit space to see minor illness patients and maximise the number of patients seen in the Ambulatory Care Unit.  The hospital was under pressure but was coping well.  £1m had been received from NHS England and was being used to fund staff in the Emergency Department and across the hospital, including at weekends.  In the Accident and Emergency Department 320 to 400 patients were being seen every day with the peak time being between 1.00pm and 7.00pm; the department had been built to deal with half this number of patients.  The majority of patients were seen within four hours but, it took more time to deal with those who needed long term care.  In November 2019 72.04% of patients had been seen within four hours, this compared to 86.13% in the previous year, but there had been a 10% increase in attendance compared to the previous year.  The number of breaches had also increased from 1,351 in November 2018 to 3,019 in November 2019.

With regard to clinical services for children and young people, services included a Paediatric Emergency Department which treated over 30,000 patients per year and included an eight bedded paediatric short stay unit.  There was also a Neonatal unit with 20 intensive care high dependency and special care cots, a 39 bedded inpatient paediatric ward, that included two oncology suites and a four bedded High Dependency Unit, and a ten bedded nurse led paediatric day care unit for elective day surgery, diagnostics and minor treatments.  The hospital also worked closely with Oxford and Southampton for really specialist care.  In December 2019, an Organisational Children’s and Young People Strategy had been approved as part of a vision of ‘working together to provide outstanding care for our community’.  The Strategy was driven by the NHS long term plan and the specific needs of children and young people and had been built around four broad themes as follows:

·         Innovation in Services;

·         Experience and Environment;

·         Careers;

·         Communications and Engagement.

The Committee discussed the presentation and a number of points were raised including the following:

·         There was a relatively low number of delayed transfers of care, with around 25 currently.  The Trust worked very closely with the Council to understand patient needs and to get them to the right setting as soon as possible;

·         In the Emergency Department staff worked very hard to get patients off trolleys and into a bed as soon as possible, patients would be under constant nursing care during this time, and no one would be on a trolley in a corridor;

·         With regard to the ‘four hour’  ...  view the full minutes text for item 25.

26.

Adult Social Care Performance Report January 2020 pdf icon PDF 76 KB

A report providing the Committee with an outline of the key areas of performance of Adult Social Care during 2018-2019 which is mainly based on performance against the Adult Social Care Outcomes Framework (ASCOF) national dataset.

Additional documents:

Minutes:

The Executive Director of Social Care and Health submitted a report that provided the Committee with an outline of the key areas of performance in Adult Social Care during 2018-2019 which was mainly based on performance against the Adult Social Care Outcomes Framework (ASCOF) national dataset.  The performance for Adult Social Care against all ASCOF measures in 2018-2019, as well as an update on current performance, was attached to the report at Appendix 1.  The report also included an action plan that addressed areas for development for two key performance targets; new admissions to residential/nursing care for younger adults aged 18 to 64 and Direct Payments.

The report provided details of a number of top performing areas as follows:

·         Following a continued focus on keeping people in their own homes, in line with the Council’s ‘home first’ approach, there had been a significant reduction in older people, aged 65 and over, that had been placed in residential and nursing care homes in the previous year.  This strong performance had continued into the current year;

·         The Advice and Wellbeing Hub had helped to connect people to more services available locally.  In addition, eight Voluntary and Community Sector (VCS) providers were part of a pilot joint working scheme at the Adult Social Care Advice and Wellbeing Hub, to strengthen links into community provision;

·         The Council held 12 contracts with VCS providers through the Narrowing the Gap Framework to develop peer support networks and reduce isolation for adults with care or support needs and these were currently being reviewed;

·         Despite concentrated focus on keeping people in their own homes, there had been a slight increase in the number of younger people who had been placed in residential and nursing care homes in the previous year.  This had been due to a lack of alternative options available to meet the needs of the younger people;

·         Direct payments had increased by 48% since 2016/17, from 12.1% to 17.9%.  From April to October 2019, they had increased further to 19%, although this was still under the local target of 22%.  Whilst Direct Payments remained a priority for Adult Social Care the lack of alternative services available to meet people’s needs beyond the Council commissioned services had resulted in a slower uptake.

The Committee discussed the report and a number of points were made including the following:

·         Safeguarding was a priority and all staff were trained in this area, staff also had to make sure that the person’s voice was heard.  However, the service was always looking to improve;

·         With regard to increasing the take-up of direct payments, managers were talking to staff about the best time to raise the issue and work was being carried out to make the process as simple as possible.  A direct payments champion had been appointed whose role it was to increase take-up and a challenge had been set for every member of staff who had not processed a direct payment in the previous six months to do so.  Social workers  ...  view the full minutes text for item 26.

27.

Better Care Fund Planning Return 2019/20 pdf icon PDF 150 KB

A report providing the Committee with an update on the Better Care Fund Funding planning template, which was completed for the financial year 2019/2020 and submitted in September 2019 in line with requested timescales.

Additional documents:

Minutes:

The Executive Director of Social Care and Health submitted a report providing the Committee with an update on the Better Care Funding planning template, which had been completed for the financial year 2019/2020 and had been submitted in September 2019 in line with requested timescales.  A table setting out supplementary information in relation to the Better Care Fund budget and spend was attached to the report at Appendix 1.  The report also included a table that provided a summary of how the Better Care Fund budget would be spent in 2019/20.

The report explained that the return had covered details of the plans to utilise the Better Care Fund and how Adult Social Care and Health services planned to use these funds in an integrated way to maximise system impact, pending NHS England agreement.  The funds had to be used to support the locality to meet the four Better Care Fund targets and the use of the funds had to be jointly agreed.  The four targets were as follows:

·         Reducing the number of placements made in residential and nursing homes;

·         Reducing the number of delayed transfers of care;

·         Reducing the number of people that returned to hospital within 90 days of their discharge;

·         Reducing non-elective admissions to hospital.

The report explained that the timing of the return and the Better Care Fund quarterly returns did not align with Health and Wellbeing Board meetings and this was compounded by short timescales to collect and draft the complex responses that were required by NHS England.  The report therefore recommended that the sign off of all future Better Care Fund returns be delegated to the Executive Director of Social Care and Health and the Clinical Commissioning Group Director of Operations for Reading in consultation with the Lead Councillor for Health, Wellbeing and Sport and the Lead Councillor for Adult Social Care.

Resolved –

(1)     That the report be noted;

(2)     That the content of the Better Care Fund submission (A summary Appendix 1 attached), which was submitted in September 2019 in order to comply with national deadlines outside of the Board meeting cycle be noted;

(3)     That the Executive Director of Social Care and Health (Reading Borough Council) and the Director of Operations (Clinical Commissioning Group) be granted delegated authority to sign off Better Care Fund returns in consultation with the Lead Councillor for Health, Wellbeing and Sport and Lead Councillor for Adult Social Care;

(4)     That the Better Care Fund planning return 2019/20 be submitted to the Health and Wellbeing Board for formal adoption.

28.

Modern Day Slavery Transparency Statement 2019-20 pdf icon PDF 131 KB

A report setting out the policy for the Council with regard to Modern Day Slavery; the Council’s Modern Slavery Transparency Statement outlines the approach the Council has taken, and continues to take, to make sure that modern slavery or human trafficking is not taking place within the business or supply chain.

Minutes:

The Executive Director of Social Care and Health submitted a report that set out the policy for the Council with regard to Modern Day Slavery.  A copy of the Modern Day Slavery Statement 2019/20 was attached to the report at Appendix 1 and an Equality Impact Assessment was attached to the report at Appendix 2.

The report explained that the Modern Day Slavery Transparency Statement outlined the approach the Council had taken, and continued to take, to make sure that modern slavery or human trafficking was not taking place within the business or supply chain and a zero tolerance approach was proposed to any form of modern slavery (slavery, servitude, human trafficking and forced labour).

The report proposed that the Modern Slavery Transparency document be adopted as required in legislation, this statement would commit the Council to ensure that it took a ‘whole Council’ approach to the issue.  The report also proposed that the Council should continue to be an active member of the Berkshire wide anti-slavery network and work in an ongoing way to deliver its safeguarding functions.

Resolved –

(1)     That adoption of the Reading Borough Council Modern Day Slavery Transparency Statement 2019/20, as attached to the report, be agreed;

(2)     That a zero tolerance approach to any form of modern slavery (slavery, servitude, human trafficking and forced labour) be agreed;

(3)     That the Executive Director of Social Care and Health Services be granted delegated authority, in consultation with the Lead Councillor for Health, Wellbeing and Sport and Lead Councillor for Adult Social Care, to adopt and update the Modern Day Slavery Transparency Statement each year on behalf of the Council.

29.

Ofsted Inspection 2019 pdf icon PDF 50 KB

A report providing the Committee with context and information about the inspection of Children’s Social Care Services which resulted in a positive ‘requires improvement to be good’ judgement.

Additional documents:

Minutes:

The Director of Children’s Services, Brighter Futures for Children, submitted a report that provided the Committee with the context and information about the inspection of Children’s Social Care Services that had resulted in a positive ‘requires improvement to be good’ judgement.  A copy of the Ofsted Inspection of Children’s Social Care Services Report was attached to the report at Appendix 1.

The report explained that there were four judgements used by Ofsted when making judgements: ‘inadequate’, ‘requires improvement to be good’, ‘good’ and ‘outstanding’, there were four judgement areas as follows:

·         The impact of leaders on social work practice with children and families;

·         The experiences and progress of children who needed help and protection;

·         The experiences and progress of children in care and care leavers;

·         Overall effectiveness.

The judgements had been ‘requires improvement to be good’ across all four areas, which was a significant achievement.

The report explained that since December 2018, services for children had been delivered by Brighter Futures for Children and Ofsted had stated that ‘the company and Council were working collaboratively, and appropriate arrangements for scrutiny and challenge were in place’.  There had been evidence of improvement in most areas of practice since the inspection that had taken place in June 2016, with recent practice being stronger although variable.  It had been noted that senior leaders had rightly focused on strengthening the recruitment and retention of staff, caseloads were reducing and there had been an increase in management capacity.  Early Help Services had continued to strengthen with well-targeted interventions and the establishment of the multi-agency hubs had contributed to a reduction in the number of referrals to children’s statutory services.  There had been seven areas identified for improvement in the Ofsted report and in order to address these an Ofsted Action Plan had been developed which was reviewed at the Children’s Services Improvement Board.

Resolved –    That the contents of the Ofsted Inspection Report of Children’s Social Care Services in September 2019 be noted.

30.

School Admissions Arrangements 2021/22 pdf icon PDF 58 KB

A report inviting the Committee to determine:

·         The admissions arrangements for Community Primary Schools in Reading for the school year 2021/22.

·         The coordinated scheme for primary and junior schools for the 2021/22 school year.

·         The coordinated scheme for secondary schools for the 2021/22 school year.

·         The Relevant Area.

·         Maps of the catchment areas.

Additional documents:

Minutes:

The Director of Children’s Services, Brighter Futures for Children, submitted a report that invited the Committee to determine:

·         The admissions arrangements for Community Primary Schools in Reading for the school year 2021/22;

·         The co-ordinated scheme for primary and junior schools for the 2021/22 school year;

·         The co-ordinated scheme for secondary schools for the 2021/22 school year;

·         The Relevant Area;

·         Maps of the catchment areas.

Copies of the schemes, policies, relevant area and maps were appended to the report.

The report explained that the Council had consulted previously on the Policy in 2018 and therefore there was no duty to consult in the current year.  The Council delivered its school admission service through Brighter Futures for Children and the documents had to be determined by 28 February 2020 to ensure the Council was compliant with the School Admissions Code and they then had to be published on the Brighter Futures for Children website by 15 March 2020.

Resolved –

(1)     That the scheme attached to the report at Annexes A, B and C as the admissions arrangements for 2021/22 for community schools in Reading and the local arrangements for complying with the national coordinated primary school admission procedures for the allocation of primary school places for residents of Reading Borough be agreed;

(2)     That the scheme attached to the report at Annex D as the local arrangements for complying with the national coordinated secondary admissions procedure for the allocation of secondary school places for 2021/22 for residents of Reading Borough be agreed;

(3)     That the relevant area as attached to the report in Annex E which sets out the organisations that must be consulted for any admissions arrangements for schools in Reading be agreed.

31.

Annual Complaints Report 2018-2019 for Children's Social Care pdf icon PDF 171 KB

A report providing the Committee with an overview of complaints activity and performance for Children’s Social Care for the period from 1 April 2018 to 31 March 2019.

Minutes:

The Director of Children’s Services, Brighter Futures for Children, submitted a report that provided the Committee with an overview of complaints activity and performance for Children’s Social Care for the period from 1 April 2018 to 31 March 2019.  A copy of the Children’s Social Care Complaints 2018/19 – Summary Report was attached to the report at Appendix A.

The report stated that during the period the service had received 96 statutory complaints, which was a decrease of 40 (29.4%) compared to 2017/18.  Of the 96 complaints that had been received:

·         19 had been resolved through Alternative Dispute Resolution by the Social Care Teams;

·         77 had progressed to a formal investigation.

During the same period, 11 complaints had progressed to a Stage 2 investigation, although these had not all been progressions of Stage 1 complaints that had been received in the same period, as some had related to Stage 1 investigations that had been carried out in 2017/18.  The Customer Relations Team had continued to raise awareness of the complaints process and in accordance with recommendations from Ofsted had worked with operational teams to encourage children and young people to submit complaints where they had been dissatisfied with the service they had received.  The Council and Brighter Futures for Children had worked closely to drive improvement in the services for children.

Resolved –

(1)     That the contents of the report and intended actions to further improve the management of representations and complaints in 2019/20 for Children’s Social Care be noted;

(2)     That the continuing work to raise awareness of the complaints process and encourage its use by children and young people be noted.