Agenda and minutes

Venue: Council Chamber, Civic Offices, Reading

Contact: Richard Woodford - Committee Administrator  Email: richard.woodford@reading.gov.uk

Link: webcast of meeting

Items
No. Item

12.

Minutes of the meeting of the Adult Social Care, Children's Services and Education Committee on 25 July 2018 pdf icon PDF 235 KB

Minutes:

The Minutes of the meeting held on 25 July 2018 were confirmed as a correct record and signed by the Chair subject to the inclusion of Councillor Vickers apologies.

13.

Questions from Members of the Public and Councillors

Questions submitted pursuant to Standing Order 36 in relation to matters falling within the Committee’s Powers & Duties which have been submitted in writing and received by the Head of Legal & Democratic Services no later than four clear working days before the meeting.

Minutes:

Questions on the following matters were submitted by Councillors:

 

Questioner

Subject

Reply

Councillor White

Fair Workload Charter for Teachers

Councillor Pearce

Councillor White

Children Centre Cuts

Councillor Terry

 

14.

An Overview of NHS England's Consultation on "Integrated Care Provider Contracts" pdf icon PDF 4 MB

A presentation providing the Committee with an overview of the Integrated Care Provider (ICP) Contract consultation run by NHS England.

Minutes:

The Director of Adult Care and Health Services gave a presentation providing the Committee with an overview of the Integrated Care Provider (ICP) Contract consultation that was being run by NHS England.  The presentation outlined the opportunities for feeding into the consultation, the process for doing so and that the consultation was about and answered a number of questions including how health and care was bought, how an ICP would work, what was in the ICP contract, who could be an ICP, how ICPs could work with GPs and whether or not there would be lots of ICPs.  The consultation would be open from 3 August to 26 October 2018.

The Committee discussed the presentation and Councillor Hoskin proposed that the Council’s response to the consultation should be based on his motion to Council on 27 March 2018 (Minute 43 refers) and should express the concern that moving to market procurement could lead to the provision of services by private providers.  The Committee agreed that the Director of Adult Care and Health Services should be given delegated authority to put together the Council’s response to the consultation in consultation with the Lead Councillor.

Resolved –

(1)     That the presentation be noted;

(2)     That Director of Adult Care and Health Services, in consultation with the Lead Councillor for Health, Wellbeing & Sport, be delegated authority to put together the Council’s response to the consultation based on the motion to Council on 27 March 2018.

 

15.

Cedar Court and the Maples Day Centre Catering pdf icon PDF 157 KB

An information report providing the Committee with an update on the progress made to provide catering to Cedar Court and The Maples.

Minutes:

The Director of Adult Care and Health Services submitted a report providing the Committee with an update on the progress made to provide catering to Cedar Court and the Maples.

The report stated that after the previous catering contract, that had been fulfilled by White Oaks (part of the Compass Group) had come to an end on 30 April 2018, the Council had entered into a contract with a micro-business, Constant Catering Services (CCS), to provide catering to Cedar Court Extra Care scheme and The Maples Day Service.  This company was owned and run by the previous head chef at Cedar Court.  The service provided was largely unchanged from that that had been provided by the previous contractor and therefore, as far as possible, fulfilled the wishes of the residents for there to be no change to the service that was provided.  The contract with CCS represented excellent value for money compared to other options that had been explored, or to provide support in the absence of any service.  An agreed sum of £10,000 had been paid to CCS for the contract, that was due to expire on 30 April 2019, to assist with start-up costs.  At the expiry of the contract the service was expected to be self-sufficient requiring no further funding or input from the Council.

Catering services at Oak Tree House Extra Care scheme were now provided by another micro-business (owned by the previous head chef at this scheme) that had been arranged by Catalyst Housing as the landlord at this scheme.  The Council’s only involvement had been to ensure that this service would provide residents with access to food seven days a week.  There was no ongoing involvement from the Council.

The report explained that the services had commenced on 1 May 2018 so that residents at Cedar Court and service users at The Maples did not receive any break in service.  Residents and visitors to Cedar Court had continued to receive the option of a two course hot meal seven days a week and people living at The Maples had continued to receive a hot meal, hot boxed to the service, on each operating day (Monday to Friday).  CCS provided an additional service of transporting the meals that had been cooked at Cedar Court to The Maples, a service which had been previously provided by a taxi company for an additional cost.  People who accessed the service had been informed of minor changes to the service, including changes to the tariff, and no objections had been raised in respect of the changes.  During the first week of the new service Commissioners had contacted colleagues from Cedar Court and The Maples for feedback on the transition and there had been no problems at either location.  Commissioners had also visited Cedar Court on 3 August 2018 and had met with the Sheltered Housing Officer and Director of CCS and it had been clear that CCS were continually striving to improve the service to ensure it remained sustainable.  ...  view the full minutes text for item 15.

16.

Progress on the Delivery of the Special Education Needs and Disability (SEND) Strategy 2017 - 2022 pdf icon PDF 413 KB

A report providing the Committee with an update on the progress being made to deliver the SEND Strategy for 2017 – 2022 and on the Short Breaks Review work, the Information, Advice and Support Service and the SEND Service performance.

Additional documents:

Minutes:

Further to minute 45 of the meeting held on 31 January 2018 the Director of Children, Education and Early Help Services submitted a report providing the Committee with an update on the progress being made to deliver the SEND Strategy for 2017 – 2022 and on the Short Breaks Review work, the Information, Advice and Support Service and the SEND Service performance.  A proposal in relation to children with autistic spectrum condition (ASC) and social communication needs which had been developed to meet local need was attached to the report at Appendix 1.

The report set out the progress being made to deliver the Strategy as follows:

Strand 1 – Analysis of data and information to inform future provision and joint commissioning – This strand had continued to analyse the data report and use it to inform actions for the strand group and others. 

Strand 2 – Early identification of needs and early intervention – In order to understand whether children and young people’s needs were being correctly identified and provided with appropriate early interventions, an analysis of Early Years Education, Health and Care Plan Needs Assessments had been carried out.

Strand 3 – Using specialist services and identified best practice to increase local capacity – This strand had focused on the two areas of greatest need that had been identified through the data report and from feedback from parents/carers and schools: children with ASC and children with social, emotional and mental health (SEMH) difficulties.  A proposal had been developed to meet local need and the report recommended the initiation of a process for commissioning additional specialist provision for primary aged pupils with ASC and social and communication needs, including the statutory consultation process.  The proposal had identified the need for a further two smaller primary specialist provision bases across the Borough to enable children’s needs to be met more locally and that all three primary specialist provisions would provide capacity for at least ten places and would provide specialist outreach to schools within their area as well as being a hub for families to seek guidance and support.  It had also been proposed that the secondary specialist provision at Blessed Hugh Faringdon, which was due to expand, would be commissioned to provide outreach support for schools across the Borough.  Overall, the aim was to increase provision in the Borough therefore reducing the cost of out of Borough placements.

Strand 4 – Transition to adulthood – Since the strand 4 action plan had been developed in April 2018, the strand had focused on actions to deliver outcome 1, which not only provided a basis for the other four outcomes but also underpinned the operational work to transfer cases from the Children and Young people with Disabilities Team to Adult Social Care.

The report also detailed the outcomes as follows:

Outcome 1 – Current processes supporting young people with SEND into adulthood were being reviewed in order to identify good practice and areas for development, an Approaching Adulthood Policy had  ...  view the full minutes text for item 16.

17.

OFSTED Monitoring Visit and Deep Dive of Children's Services pdf icon PDF 291 KB

A report on the Ofsted Monitoring Visit and Deep Dive of Children’s Services.

 

Minutes:

The Director of Children, Education and Early Help Services submitted a report providing the Committee with an update on the monitoring visit that Ofsted had carried out on 31 July and 1 August 2018 on Looked After Children (LAC) over 16 years old and Care Leavers, and the Deep Dive exercise the Commissioner had carried out on 5 and 6 September 2018 which had looked at the overall Children’s Social Care system with a focus on children in need who had recently been referred to the Department. 

The report stated that the main finding from the monitoring visit had been that young people leaving care were in receipt of better services than they had been at the last inspection visit two years previously.  Ofsted had observed that there was careful preparation of young people to leave care, there were sustained efforts to help all young people in this cohort, there was determined and dedicated work and there was a strong intent to improve the lives of care leavers which had permeated the work of practitioners.  Inspectors had stated that senior managers had worked methodically to improve the range and suitability and availability of accommodation for young people.  The Housing Department and Children’s Social Care had been found to be working in partnership and were offering 12 social housing flats for care leavers each year.  The Housing Department also supported and advised young people on how to obtain suitable and decent standard accommodation in the private rented sector and importantly no young people had been placed in bed and breakfast or unsuitable houses of multiple occupation.

Young people who had arrived in the Borough as unaccompanied asylum seekers had been judged to be carefully supported and found accommodation suitable to their needs.  Progress had also been made in engaging more young people leaving care in meaningful education, employment and training opportunities.  Key areas for further development had been identified as follows:

?    Improving participation and involvement of young people in developing and influencing provision;

?   Ensuring a clear pathway for emotional health and wellbeing service with health partners;

?   Continuing to improve supervision practice to eradicate variability.

The report explained that the Council was still awaiting formal written feedback from the Deep Dive visit that had taken place in September 2018 and a full report was expected in the near future.  At the verbal feedback session from the Commissioner to senior managers and the Lead Councillor for Children on 7 September 2018, the key areas that were going well had been defined as follows:

?   Better match between senior managers and front line narrative regarding identified need improvements being made;

?   Improved partnership working and relationships;

?   Greater stability with senior managers and good political drive for improvement;

?   Good support for newly qualified social workers;

?   Good specialist skills and response from the front door;

?   Stability and good local knowledge in Early Help Services;

?   Some growing evidence of ‘children’s voice’ evidenced in work observed.

Areas that still needed more work included the following:

?   Recording needed to be  ...  view the full minutes text for item 17.